Census of Population and Housing 1966: Detailed Tables

What are the 1966 Census detailed tables?

Dimensions of data sets

1966 Census publications

Record structure

Details of Classifications

Download an .rtf version of documents related to the Detailed Tables

What are the 1966 Census detailed tables?

Data for each State and Territory is held in the form of 20 tables. Each record of the data contains information on one cell of the cross-tabulation. For each cell, 'indicative' information indicates the values of the tabulated variables defining the cell and a 'tally' gives the number of persons or (dwellings) in that cell. Cells with zero tally are excluded.

Tables 2-19 contain information at small geographic area level (CD in metropolitan areas, Statistical Division by urban/rural otherwise) on: birthplace groups by sex by occupation, period of residence, sex by age, dwelling class by nature of occupancy by period of residence, no. of inhabitants by no. of rooms; and dwelling class by age, occupation, and marital status. Table 1 gives marital status by education by age for the 100 groups of the ANU1 Occupation Classification. Table 20 gives the age by no. of children to existing marriage distribution of married women.

Dimensions of data sets

The Detailed Tables on Magnetic Tape contain 152 data files; 20 for each of the 6 States and the ACT, 11 for the Northern Territory and one for Australia. The number of records in each file is given in the table below.

Table No.	Number of records
	NSW	Vic	Qld	SA	WA	Tas	ACT	NT
 1	20941	19064	13008	11401	9706	6630	3230	2477
 2	153340	137798	32839	47459	29535	5985	6153	---
 3	63752	59005	12315	19350	11595	2276	2667	---
 4	313409	282946	67362	98769	62400	11468	12812	---
 5	68048	58127	14929	18809	11425	2696	2632	---
 6	54752	51584	10943	16066	10752	1751	2148	---
 7	65717	60133	12898	18504	12629	2001	2261	---
 8	76119	59859	19004	20805	12436	3323	2318	---
 9	39485	31514	10164	11319	6945	1823	1304	---
10	27152	21132	6781	7612	4654	1192	815	---
11	3427	2738	2879	1852	2094	1266	204	1310
12	1280	993	1121	758	854	515	90	536
13	6006	4741	5045	3454	3753	2362	408	2323
14	1923	1423	1603	941	1153	621	87	582
15	2664	2091	1902	1220	1480	589	60	389
16	2156	1706	1791	1143	1309	592	72	551
17	785	561	777	446	519	390	92	535
18	503	360	493	271	324	244	51	312
19	277	200	274	155	184	132	28	172
20	1127	814	1112	650	756	572	924	851

Table 1 is also available for Australia with 27398 records. The record length is 23 characters in Tables 2,4,11 and 13 and 21 characters for all other tables. The first record of each file gives the table number and geographic coverage and must be ignored when processing.

1966 Census publications

The 1966 Census publication programme is made up of five individual Volumes, four consisting of a number of separate Parts, together with a series of supplementary statements in mimeographed form. The content of each Volume is briefly as follows:

Volume 1. Single characteristics of the population for Australia, Parts 1-11. - Age, marital status, birthplace, nationality, period of residence, education, religion, occupational status industry, occupation, and race.

Volume 2. Related characteristics of the population for Australia, Parts 1-5. - Growth and distribution of the population, demographic data, overseas-born population, the work force, and families and households.

Volume 3. Housing

Volume 4. Single characteristics of the population and dwellings in Local Government Areas, Parts 1-7. - New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, South Australia, Western Australia, Tasmania, and Northern Territory and Australian Capital Territory.

Volume 5. Population and dwellings in localities, Parts 1-7. - States and Territories as for Volume 4, and Part 8. - Australia.

CODEBOOK

Record structure

A description of the tables and the record format is given below. In all tables the slower moving variable is given first.

Table 1: Females only
Table 2: Metropolitan areas only
Table 3: Metropolitan areas only
Table 4: Metropolitan areas only
Table 5: Head of household, Metropolitan areas only
N.B. Dwelling class x Nature of occupancy is a combined variable with codes 1-12.
Table 6: Head of household, Metropolitan areas only
N.B. Dwelling class x Nature of occupancy x Birthplace is a combined variable with codes 1-60.
Table 7: Metropolitan areas only
N.B. No. of inhabitants x No. of rooms is a combined variable with codes 1-30.
Table 8: Metropolitan areas only
Table 9: Metropolitan areas only
Table 10: Metropolitan areas only
Table 11-19: Non-metropolitan areas only

As for Tables 2-10 respectively but for non-metropolitan areas, with Section of State (Urban,Rural) and Statistical Division replacing LGA and CD respectively.

Table 20: Married women only

Details of Classifications

Age (1-25)
    1-15 = 15 to 29 in single years
    16-24 = 30 to 74 in 5 year groups
    25 = 75 and over
Age (1-14)
    1-13 = 0 to 64 in 5 year groups
    14 = 65 and over
Age (30-34, 45-49, other)
    1 = 30-34
    2 = 45-49
    3 = other
Birthplace (1-10)
    1 = Australia, New Zealand & Australian Territories
    2 = British Isles
    3 = Greece
    4 = Italy
    5 = Malta
    6 = Yugoslavia
    7 = Germany
    8 = Netherlands
    9 = Poland
    10 = Other
Birthplace (2-9)
    Codes 2-9 above recoded as 1-8
Birthplace (2-6)
    Codes 2-6 above recoded as 1-5
CD. Census Collector's District
    CD's are numbered sequentially from 1 within each LGA.
Children to existing marriage, No. of
    1-10 = 0-9 children
    11 = 10 and more children
    12 = not stated
    13 = Total number of children to existing marriage of all married women in Stat. Div. x Section of State x Age cell.
Dwelling class (1-3)
    1 = Private houses, including Principal Shares of private houses
    2 = Self-contained flats, including Principal Shares of flats
    3 = Other private dwelling
Dwelling class (1-2)
    Codes 1 and 2 above
Education (1-8)
    1 = University
    2 = Other tertiary
    3 = Leaving or Matriculation passed
    4 = Intermediate or junior passed
    5 = Attended High School
    6 = Attended Primary
    7 = No education
    8 = Not stated
Inhabitants, No. of (1-5)
    1 = 1-3
    2 = 4 and 5
    3 = 6 and 7
    4 = 8 and 9
    5 = 10 or more
LGA, Local Government Area
Marital Status (1-5)
    1 = Never married
    2 = Married
    3 = Married but permanently separated
    4 = Divorced
    5 = Widowed
Nature of Occupancy (1-4)
    1 = Owner
    2 = Tenant of Govt Authority
    3 = Tenant-other
    4 = Caretaker, other & Not stated
Occupation (1-100)

    The ANU 1 occupation classification developed from the Classification and Classified List of Occupations (CCLO), for details see:

    Broom, Leonard, F. Lancaster Jones and Jerzy Zubrzycki (1965). An occupation classification of the Australian workforce. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Sociology, 1, Supplement.

    The codes 1-100 correspond to the ANU codes 00-99 respectively, shown below grouped into 16 hierarchically ordered categories.

    1. Upper professional
      00 Architects, engineers, and surveyors
      01 Natural scientists and university teachers
      02 Medical practitioners and dentists
      04 Pharmacists
      06 Clergymen and religious workers
      07 Judges, magistrates, barristers and solicitors
      10 Accountants, auditors and economists
      46 Ship and aircraft officers
    
    2. Graziers, and wheat and sheep farmers
      30 Wheat and sheep farmers
      33 Graziers
    
    3. Lower professional
      03 Nurses and professional medical workers (not elsewhere classified - n.e.c.)
      05 Teachers (exc. university)
      08 Writers, creative artists and entertainers
      09 Draftsmen and technicians
      11 Other professional workers
      40 Wool classers
    
    4. Managerial
      12 Public service administrators and overseas officials
      13 Inspectors and local government inspectors
      14 Managers (manufacturing)
      15 Managers (building and construction)
      16 Managers (transport, storage and communication)
      17 Managers (finance)
      18 Managers (commerce)
      19 Managers (personal services)
      20 Managers (rural services)
      21 Managers (business services and other)
    
    5. Self-employed shop proprietors
      27 Shop proprietors (self-employed)
    
    6. Other farmers
      31 Fruit, vegetable, and sugar-cane growers, poultry farmers and other primary producers (n.e.c.)
      32 Mixed farmers and farmers (n.e.c.)
      34 Dairy farmers
    
    7. Clerical and related workers
      22 Bookkeepers and cashiers
      23 Clerks, typists, and office machine operators
      24 Public servants (n.e.c.)
      25 Insurance and real estate salesmen
      26 Commercial travellers
      48 Stationmasters, postmasters and transport inspectors
      49 Postal officers, and telephone and telecommunication workers
    
    8. Members of Armed Services and Police Forces
      88 Policemen
      98 Members of Armed Services
    
    9. Craftsmen and foremen
      51 Tailors, cutters and related tradesmen
      54 Blacksmiths and moulders
      55 Precision instrument makers, watchmakers and jewellers
      56 Fitters and turners, toolsetters and toolmakers
      57 Mechanics and vehicle body builders
      59 Plumbers, welders and boilermakers
      60 Electricians and radio and TV mechanics
      63 Carpenters and cabinetmakers
      66 Painters and decorators
      67 Bricklayers, plasterers and related tradesmen
      68 Building and construction foremen
      70 Printing machinists, compositors and related tradesmen
      73 Bakers, confectioners and brewers
    
    10. Shop assistants
      28 Shop assistants
    
    11. Operatives and process workers
      50 Textile and clothing factory workers
      52 Leather and shoe factory workers
      53 Metal workers and iron workers
      58 Sheetmetal workers
      61 Linesmen and electrical and metal process workers (n.e.c.)
      64 Wood machinists and box- and basket-makers
      65 Sawmill and wood factory workers
      71 Glass factory and pottery workers
      72 Food and beverage production workers
      74 Chemical and paper production workers
      75 Rubber and plastic production workers
      76 Miscellaneous craftsmen and process workers (n.e.c.)
      78 Lifting equipment and stationary engine operators
      79 Earthmoving and construction equipment operators
      80 Railway and tramway repairmen and oilers and greasers
    
    12. Drivers
      47 Drivers and workers in railway, road and sea transport
    
    13. Personal, domestic, and other service workers
      29 Service station attendants and salesmen (n.e.c.)
      39 Gardeners and groundkeepers
      87 Firebrigade men and protective service workers (n.e.c.)
      89 Cleaners, caretakers, domestic service workers, maids and housekeepers
      90 Cooks and chefs
      91 Catering workers and waiters
      92 Bartenders.
      93 Hairdressers and beauticians
      94 Launderers and dry cleaners
      95 Athletes and sportsmen
      96 Photographers, undertakers and service workers (n.e.c.)
      97 Hospital and medical attendants
    
    14. Miners
      43 Non-metalliferous miners and quarrymen.
      44 Coal miners
      45 Metalliferous miners and mineral treaters
    
    15. Farm and rural workers
      35 Farm workers (exc. grazing and dairy farm)
      36 Grazing station hands
      37 Shearers
      38 Dairy farm workers
      41 Hunters, trappers and fishermen
      42 Timber getters and forestry workers
    
    16. Laborers
      62 Laborers and tradesmen's assistants in electrical and metal manufacturing
      69 Building and construction laborers
      77 Packer, and laborers in glass, ceramics, chemical and manufacturing (n.e.c.)
      81 Waterside workers
      82 Storemen and packers and transport laborers
      83 Laborers in textik and clothing factories
      84 Laborers  in food and drink processing factories
      85 Laborers in electricity, gas and water production supply
      86 Laborers (n.e.c.)
    
    17. Inadequately defined
      99 Other (inc. not stated)
    
Occupation (1-9)

    A condensed form of the Occupation (1-100) code based on the sixteen grouped categories above and used in:

    Broom, Leonard and F. Lancaster Jones ( 1969) . Career mobility in three societies: Australia, Italy, and the United States. American Sociological Review, 34, 650-8 . 1 = Professional (Groups 1, 3)
    2 = Managerial (Groups 4, 5)
    3 = Clerical (Group 7)
    4 = Skilled (Group 9)
    5 = Semi-skilled and Service (Groups 10-12, 8)
    6 = Unskilled (Groups 13, 14, 16)
    7 = Farmers-Graziers (Groups 2, 6)
    8 = Farm-Workers (Group 15)
    9 = Unstated

Period of residence (1-7)
    1 = Before 1947
    2 = 1947-54
    3 = 1954-61
    4 = 1961-64
    5 = 1964-65
    6 = 1965-66
    7 = Not stated
Rooms, No. of (1-6)
    1 = 1 and 2
    2 = 3
    3 = 4
    4 = 5
    5 = 6 and 7
    6 = 8 and more
Section of State (Metro, Urban, Rural)
    1 = Metropolitan area
    2 = Urban
    3 = Rural
Section of State (Urban, Rural)
    1 = Urban
    2 = Rural
Sex (1-2)
    1 = Male
    2 = Female
Statistical Division

    Statistical Divisions are represented by a two digit numeric code allocated sequentially within each State. The number of Statistical Divisions within each State are:

      NSW = 14, Vic. = 10, Qld = 14, SA = 8, WA = 10, Tas = 9

    For the Northern Territory and ACT, each of which comprise only one Statistical Division, the code refers to LGA, where codes are allocated sequentially from 1 in alphabetic order of LGA name. For the NT, codes range from 1-32 and for the ACT, from 1-35.

    For details, see the 1966 Census Code List of Local Government Areas in Statistical Division Order.

 

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